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MEDIATION AND COLLABORATIVE DIVORCE ATTORNEY

Divorce is a difficult thing for any family.  Mediation and the Collaborative Process gives spouses the opportunity to decide the details of their own divorce, allowing for what is best for their family.

 

Experience as a Divorce Attorney and training in Alternative Dispute Resolution, provided the skills and knowledge base necessary to work as a neutral third party and assist couples working through the issues they need to resolve in their divorce through amicable and cost effective processes. 

 
 
 
Professional Associations and Membership
  • National Association of Divorce Professionals - Greenwich Chapter

  • Member of IACP - International Academy of Collaborative Professionals

  • Member of Fairfield County Collaborative Divorce Group

  • Member of Connecticut Counsel for Non-Adversarial Divorce

  • Connecticut Bar Association

  • Fairfield County Bar Association

Education

Rutgers University - School of Law, Camden, New Jersey J.D., 2000

Indiana University -Bloomington, Indiana

B.A., 1997 

Bar Admissions

Connecticut, 2004

New Jersey, 2000

COMMON QUESTIONS

What is the Mediators Role?
How much will this cost?
 

The Mediator's role is to be a neutral party that facilitates a respectful and productive dialogue between the divorcing couple.  Assisting the divorcing couple in formulating their ideas which can eventually lead to agreements. Settlement agreements which people determine for themselves are more likely to withstand the test of time versus court ordered divorces.

Cost of  Mediation is significantly less than litigating a divorce.  Divorce, mediation is focused on cooperation and full disclosure.  Parties are able to share the expense of a mediator, in comparison to each side hiring their counsel and litigating the matter in court. When parties mediate they are both equally vested in resolving the dispute, which takes less time.

How long does it take to mediate a case?

Mediation is almost always faster than going through divorce court.  The average amicable case can be resolved through six to eight two-hour mediation sessions during a three to six month time period.  More complex cases can take more than six months to complete. 

What happens if mediation fails?

Mediation is confidential; therefore, providing a safe environment for the parties.  Should the parties agree on most issues, a settlement agreement can be prepared.  The remaining issues can be litigated or the clients can determine to take a break and return to mediation at a later date.

What is Collaborative Divorce?

Collaborative Divorce is a method of alternative dispute resolution which offers a process to parties that is non-judgmental and goal oriented.  It is interdisciplinary utilizing mental health and financial neutral as well as attorneys. Professionals are focused on the interests of the parties offering more options for settlement.  the process is tailored to foster environments that are conducive to everyone's success.

What does a Collaborative Divorce look like?

Collaborative Divorce is unique because each party is represented by a non-adversarial attorney.  the parties agree not to litigate and to utilize a team that includes the use of a financial neutral and a mental health professional.  With all these professional involved the divorce process is supported in a multi-faceted way that allows the couple to make secure and educated decisions about the future of their family.

How long is the process?

There are three main components to a Collaborative Divorce that happen after your initial meeting where all the parties sign an agreement that you are entering into a Collaborative Divorce, there is the information gathering, which entails meeting with the Financial Neutral and the Mental Health Professional.  Next, is the part of the process whereby we generate options that address the goals and concerns of the parties. This part is the most lengthy part of the process.  Lastly, based on the decisions of the parties, we draft a separation agreement.  Once this is reviewed and approved by the parties, it, along with the necessary documents, is filed with the court and we await a court date.  Then parties go to court with counsel to finalize their divorce.  

Is it confidential?

Yes, it is both confidential and transparent.  These contradictory concepts exist side-by-side in the same dispute resolution process because the process is designed to be transparent in the sense that all information that may be important to resolving the dispute must be disclosed.  Confidentiality in the Collaborative Divorce process extends to all the information exchanged within the process against the outside world. Confidentiality with your attorney still exists in the Collaborative Divorce.  Client's are not precluded from instructing their attorney maintain the confidence of information.  However, the transparency requirement assures integrity in the process both from a conflict resolution and from a legal standpoint.

Talking with Trevor and Jill about Collaborative Divorce